Get Started Learning Python for Data Science with “Unpacking NumPy and Pandas”

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Stock Trading Analytics and Optimization in Python with PyFolio, R’s PerformanceAnalytics, and backtrader

DISCLAIMER: Any losses incurred based on the content of this post are the responsibility of the trader, not me. I, the author, neither take responsibility for the conduct of others nor offer any guarantees. None of this should be considered as financial advice; the content of this article is only for educational/entertainment purposes.

Introduction

Having figured out how to perform walk-forward analysis in Python with backtrader, I want to have a look at evaluating a strategy’s performance. So far, I have cared about only one metric: the final value of the account at the end of a backtest relative. This should not be the only metric considered. Most people care not only about how much money was made but how much risk was taken on. People are risk-averse; one of finance’s leading principles is that higher risk should be compensated by higher returns. Thus many metrics exist that adjust returns for how much risk was taken on. Perhaps when optimizing only with respect to the final return of the strategy we end up choosing highly volatile strategies that lead to huge losses in out-of-sample data. Adjusting for risk may lead to better strategies being chosen.

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Walk-Forward Analysis Demonstration with backtrader

DISCLAIMER: Any losses incurred based on the content of this post are the responsibility of the trader, not me. I, the author, neither take responsibility for the conduct of others nor offer any guarantees. None of this should be considered as financial advice; the content of this article is only for educational/entertainment purposes.

Finally I can apply a walk-forward analysis!

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Getting Started with backtrader

A few weeks ago, I ranted about the R backtesting package quantstrat and its related packages. Specifically, I disliked that I would not be able to do a particular type of walk-forward analysis with quantstrat, or at least was not able to figure out how to do so. In general, I disliked how usable quantstrat seemed to be. The package’s interface seems flexible in some areas, inflexible in others, due to a strange architecture that I eventually was not willing to put up with anymore.

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Who Survives Riddler Nation?

Introduction

Last week, I published an article on learning to fight in the Battle for Riddler Nation. Here’s a refresher of the rules:

In a distant, war-torn land, there are 10 castles. There are two warlords: you and your archenemy. Each castle has its own strategic value for a would-be conqueror. Specifically, the castles are worth 1, 2, 3, …, 9, and 10 victory points. You and your enemy each have 100 soldiers to distribute, any way you like, to fight at any of the 10 castles. Whoever sends more soldiers to a given castle conquers that castle and wins its victory points. If you each send the same number of troops, you split the points. You don’t know what distribution of forces your enemy has chosen until the battles begin. Whoever wins the most points wins the war.

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The End of the Honeymoon: Falling Out of Love with quantstrat

Introduction

I spent good chunks of Friday, Saturday, and Sunday attempting to write another blog post on using R and the quantstrat package for backtesting, and all I have to show for my work is frustration. So I’ve started to fall out of love with quantstrat and am thinking of exploring Python backtesting libraries from now on.

Here’s my story…

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Order Type and Parameter Optimization in quantstrat

DISCLAIMER: Any losses incurred based on the content of this post are the responsibility of the trader, not the author. The author takes no responsibility for the conduct of others nor offers any guarantees.

Introduction

You may have noticed I’ve been writing a lot about quantstrat, an R package for developing and backtesting trading strategies. The package strikes me as being so flexible, there’s still more to write about. So far I’ve introduced the package here and here, then recently discussed the important of accounting for transaction costs (and how to do so).

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