Beyond Univariate, Single-Sample Data with MCHT

Introduction

I’ve spent the past few weeks writing about MCHT, my new package for Monte Carlo and bootstrap hypothesis testing. After discussing how to use MCHT safely, I discussed how to use it for maximized Monte Carlo (MMC) testing, then bootstrap testing. One may think I’ve said all I want to say about the package, but in truth, I’ve only barely passed the halfway point!

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Materials for Teaching Applied Statistics

Today is the first day of the new academic year at the University of Utah. This semester I am teaching MATH 3070: Applied Statistics I, the fourth time I’ve taught this course.

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Replication Intervals

At the University of Utah I’ve taught MATH 1070 and MATH 3070. Both are introductory statistics classes, but I call MATH 1070 “Introductory Statistics for People Who Don’t Like Math” while MATH 3070 is “Introductory Statistics for People Who Do Like Math”, since the latter requires calculus and uses far more probability. In both classes, though, students need to learn what confidence intervals (CIs) say and don’t say, and I spend a lot of time debunking common misconceptions for what a confidence interval says.

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Learn Basic Python and scikit-learn Machine Learning Hands-On with My Course: Training Your Systems with Python Statistical Modelling

This post is actually months late, but like with my last video course announcement, it’s better late than never. And besides, of my video courses, I had the most fun writing this one.

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Where to Go from Here? Tips for Building Up R Experience

At the University of Utah, I teach the R lab that accompanies MATH 3070, “Applied Statistics I.”” None of my students are presumed to have any programming experience, and they never hesitate to remind me of that fact, especially when they are starting out. When I create assignments and pick problems, I often can write a one- or three-line solution in thirty seconds that students will sometimes spend four hours trying to solve. They then see my solution and slap their foreheads at its simplicity. I can be tricky with my solutions. For example, suppose you wish to find the sample proportion for a certain property. A common approach (or at least the one used in the textbook our course uses, Using R for Introductory Statistics by John Verzani) looks like this:

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Did Wages Detach from Productivity in 1973? An Investigation

This is the third and final blog post in my series on income inequality (read the other two here and here). This post discusses the detachment of compensation from productivity that occurred around 1973. I look at the data and use R for exploring this break, along with why it may have occurred. R code is with the analysis, in the spirit of reproducible research.

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How the House Makes a Profit: A R Shiny App for Explaining the Key Idea to Gambling

As many of you may know, I teach statistics at the University of Utah. Below is a post about how industries based on chance events, such as casinos or insurance companies, are able to guarantee a profit. I have also included R code for a Shiny app that demonstrates the ideas discussed in the blog post.

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